Christopher

Christopher Kokoski is a writer and course creator. He has written for national organizations and national publications (including a few in peer-reviewed journals), published national training material, ghostwritten screenplays and is the author of the Query Letter Swipe File, the Past Lives novel series, and the standalone novel, Wicker Hollow,

How to Write Filler Scenes (25 Best Tips, Types, & Examples)

Blog post image of a couple in a cafe at night - How to Write Filler Scenes

Often overpowered by more dramatic story moments, filler scenes hold immense power in setting tone, developing characters, and keeping the reader engaged. Here’s how to write filler scenes: Write filler scenes by focusing on character development, setting mood, and foreshadowing. They should engage senses, be interesting, and stay true to characters. Common types include internal […]

How to Write Filler Scenes (25 Best Tips, Types, & Examples) Read More »

How to Write Fast-Paced Scenes: 21 Tips to Keep Readers Glued

Blog post image of woman in front of giant monster - How to write fast-paced scenes

Everyone loves a page-turner. Here’s how to write fast-paced scenes: Write fast-paced scenes by focusing on streamlined prose, dynamic dialogue, and engaging sensory details. Include a clear purpose, stakes, and emotional tension. In action scenes, map out sequences and use short sentences. In dialogue, eliminate filler and use interruptions. In this guide, you’ll learn everything

How to Write Fast-Paced Scenes: 21 Tips to Keep Readers Glued Read More »

How to Write Two Simultaneous Scenes (Explained + Examples)

Blog post image of a man and woman in the city - How to Write Simultaneous scenes

Sometimes you want to write two scenes that happen at the same time in your story or screenplay. Here is how to write two simultaneous scenes: Write simultaneous scenes by ensuring clarity, maintaining complementary pacing, connecting thematically, using dialogue strategically, and sticking to the chosen POV. Also, limit exposition, differentiate locations, repeat motifs, vary scene

How to Write Two Simultaneous Scenes (Explained + Examples) Read More »

How to Write Death Scenes (Ultimate Guide + 21 Examples)

Blog post cover image of a man laying in a battle field - How to Write Death Scenes

Writing death scenes adds a new meaning to the popular writing phrase, “Kill your darlings.” Here is how to write death scenes: Write death scenes by focusing on sensory details, context, and symbolism. Use words like “eternal” or “finality” to set the mood. Incorporate elements like scent, sound, and even texture for added realism. Poetry

How to Write Death Scenes (Ultimate Guide + 21 Examples) Read More »

How to Write Chase Scenes (13 Best Tips + Examples)

Blog post cover image of two cars in a dark rainy night - How to write chase scenes

Chase sences are iconic storytelling devices and nearly impossible to avoid when writing anything dramatic. Here’s how to write chase scenes: Write chase scenes by emphasizing stakes, pacing, and character depth. Opt for different types like foot or car chases, and add humor or romance. Use setting actively, surprise with twists, and resolve impactfully. Be

How to Write Chase Scenes (13 Best Tips + Examples) Read More »

How to Write Bullying Scenes (Ultimate Guide + 17 Examples)

Blog post cover image of man and woman bullies - How to Write Bullying Scenes

As a writer who has experience with being bullied, writing bullying scenes is both a personal and visceral challenge. Here’s how to write bullying scenes: Write a bullying scene in fiction by knowing the major types: physical, verbal, emotional, digital, and group bullying. Mirror real-world dynamics, use subtlety, and showcase consequences. Consider the viewpoints of

How to Write Bullying Scenes (Ultimate Guide + 17 Examples) Read More »

How to Write Awkward Scenes (Ultimate Guide + Examples)

Digital image an awkward boy and girl - How to Write Awkward Scenes

Awkward scenes in storytelling are crucial for adding depth, tension, and layers of complexity. This is how to write awkward scenes in your story: Write an awkward scene by focusing on pacing, body language, inner monologue, and environmental details. Pacing sets the tempo, letting awkwardness linger. Use body language like fidgeting or avoiding eye contact

How to Write Awkward Scenes (Ultimate Guide + Examples) Read More »

How to Describe Eyes in Writing (21 Best Tips + Examples)

Close up of a colorful eye - How to Describe Eyes in Writing

Eyes are often hailed as the “windows to the soul,” capable of conveying complex emotions without uttering a single word. As writers, mastering the art of describing eyes can elevate your storytelling. Here is how to describe eyes in writing: Describe eyes in writing by focusing on color, shape, and emotional depth. Use descriptive words

How to Describe Eyes in Writing (21 Best Tips + Examples) Read More »